Sermons on 1 Corinthians Study

“Running to Win”

Athletes are truly inspiring to watch in action. They have trained to be the best at what they do. Natural talent is not everything, their ability had to be developed through a rigorous training plan which encompassed every area of their lives. Our passage today compares the Christian life to an athletic event. Some who at first profess faith in Christ end up giving up on Christ to go after sin. Others fail to live in Christ and end up in guilt and shame for their decisions (Mark 14:27-30). Our passage today reminds us that the key to Christian living is devotion, and we discipline ourselves for the things we love. What kind of discipline helps us grow in devotion?

“Exceeding Expectations and Ending Entitlements”

What makes a truly unique person? The people we tend to admire the most are people who march to the beat of a different drummer and, at the same time, show more concern about others than themselves. You know you can’t control them, but on the other side, there is no reason we would want to control them. In our passage this morning, we will see how the Apostle Paul could not be controlled by anyone, other than God, and how he used that freedom to love the people around him.

“Love Builds Up”

Have you ever heard someone say, “It’s okay, as long as I don’t hurt anyone else.” In the letter to the Corinthians, the Apostle Paul shows that our actions have a bigger effect than we might think. This gives us a reason to pursue holiness through faith and obedience for the benefit of others. In doing this, he points us to Jesus and reminds us that the essence of love is to pursue the good of others, even if it comes at our own expense.

“Having a Single-Minded Focus”

Spiritual growth requires more than external change, it requires internal transformation. Some of the Christians in Corinth were telling single people it was a sin to get married. This created a challenge for engaged people – should they break off their commitment or follow through and get married? In our passage, we read how this anti-marriage teaching was so wrong – our spiritual life is not built on our marital status, but upon our devotion to Jesus Christ. Today we will see how to get more spiritually focused by looking at some differences between marriage and singleness. The key point of our passage is that we need to do all we can to keep our focus on the Lord.

“Living on Assignment from God”

How do we find contentment in our situation? Some will say that we need to change our circumstances. This is not always possible. And it doesn’t always help. Others will resign themselves to their circumstances in quiet despair. The Corinthians thought that changing their situation would make them happier or more spiritual. We have that same temptation. The truth we need is that joy is found in contentment. God’s call upon our lives is a good gift, according to His sovereignty, and we must find joy by living in it. What are the keys to contentment?

“Sexual Sanity in an Insane World”

The city of Corinth viewed sex much like the world in which we live today–casually. This casual approach to sex had infiltrated the church and it continues to pressure the church today. The world does not appreciate the meaning God has built into intimacy, and as a result, many people suffer after ignoring God’s design. We should not treat sex casually, we
have a call to glorify God, and we need to flee sin to honor God in our bodies.

“Handling Disputes in the Church”

We all experience conflict in this life. Sometimes those conflicts end up in court as lawsuits. In the Corinthian church, one member was suing another member for fraud, and no one was doing anything about it. Sadly, conflict – even to the point of lawsuits – affects Christians today. Shouldn’t we be able to solve these problems? Shouldn’t our faith help us live in peace? Our Bible passage addresses that today, reminding us that our decision-making should be guided by hope in the kingdom of God, not this world. Faith in Christ leads us to solving problems differently.